bombmagazine:

Raymond Pettibon, No Title (It was posting), 1990, pen and ink on paper, 14 × 11”.
"I read as I write, write as I read. If it used to take me five minutes to read the whole newspaper, now, my mind wanders, and then five minutes later I wonder, Gee, did I read that? I used to take notes, and I have notebooks full of drawings and notes that were partly quotations, and I’ve done a lot of marginalia, writing in books. I’m usually reading a number of books at a time, and whether I get through an individual one is probably unlikely. I’ve lost interest in narrative. (sigh) At least in the sense of seeing how a story comes out at the end. There’s a type of reading where you get lost in the narrative and you become part of the story and you’re compelled to finish. I don’t really have any interest in that. For me, reading has become more microscopic, more about dissecting the work. It may start on the level of the novel, then go down to theme or style, then to a paragraph, and finally a sentence. Or the sentence itself becomes about structure, or the words in it. Probably the most obvious example of that kind of reading is James Joyce. It becomes a kind of disease. Every text becomes related to another one, even in a different language, down to each individual word, which then becomes a clue into the etymology of the word, and then that etymological tree. A different context, a different language … you’re just making these associations from one thing to another. I used to start out with a simple drawing that would begin as an idea, and then my writing would make some associations with something else. And then, you know, a day later, or a year later, or whenever, the whole page would be covered with small, finely written text. And it would become a lot of things that were meant to be just in one drawing, expanded into this while still part of my notes. Voluminous notes. You do actually get lost in that morass of associations.”
(Read more)

bombmagazine:

Raymond PettibonNo Title (It was posting), 1990, pen and ink on paper, 14 × 11”.

"I read as I write, write as I read. If it used to take me five minutes to read the whole newspaper, now, my mind wanders, and then five minutes later I wonder, Gee, did I read that? I used to take notes, and I have notebooks full of drawings and notes that were partly quotations, and I’ve done a lot of marginalia, writing in books. I’m usually reading a number of books at a time, and whether I get through an individual one is probably unlikely. I’ve lost interest in narrative. (sigh) At least in the sense of seeing how a story comes out at the end. There’s a type of reading where you get lost in the narrative and you become part of the story and you’re compelled to finish. I don’t really have any interest in that. For me, reading has become more microscopic, more about dissecting the work. It may start on the level of the novel, then go down to theme or style, then to a paragraph, and finally a sentence. Or the sentence itself becomes about structure, or the words in it. Probably the most obvious example of that kind of reading is James Joyce. It becomes a kind of disease. Every text becomes related to another one, even in a different language, down to each individual word, which then becomes a clue into the etymology of the word, and then that etymological tree. A different context, a different language … you’re just making these associations from one thing to another. I used to start out with a simple drawing that would begin as an idea, and then my writing would make some associations with something else. And then, you know, a day later, or a year later, or whenever, the whole page would be covered with small, finely written text. And it would become a lot of things that were meant to be just in one drawing, expanded into this while still part of my notes. Voluminous notes. You do actually get lost in that morass of associations.”

(Read more)



eligy:

l’après-midi au Louvre | part I

eligy:

l’après-midi au Louvre | part I


therealultrabaguette:

essegigi:

daftwithoneshoe:

harleys-hyenas:

daftwithoneshoe:

Am I the only one really bothered by the fact that the strawberry and the blackberry are touching?

Let them touch, they don’t get to often because of their tragic forbidden love.
Long ago, two Elder berries got into a fight, the tribe split in two, the strawberries against the blackberries. Now, new passions arise between the new generation - could this be the end of the feud or will it just fan the flames? 

Two flavors, both alike in sweetness In fair Verona, where we lay our scene From ancient cold break new freezer burn Where civil juice makes civil fruits unclean


Did you just turn gelato into Shakespeare. 

therealultrabaguette:

essegigi:

daftwithoneshoe:

harleys-hyenas:

daftwithoneshoe:

Am I the only one really bothered by the fact that the strawberry and the blackberry are touching?

Let them touch, they don’t get to often because of their tragic forbidden love.

Long ago, two Elder berries got into a fight, the tribe split in two, the strawberries against the blackberries. Now, new passions arise between the new generation - could this be the end of the feud or will it just fan the flames? 

Two flavors, both alike in sweetness
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene
From ancient cold break new freezer burn
Where civil juice makes civil fruits unclean

Did you just turn gelato into Shakespeare.
 

(via englishmajorhumor)


Runaway
Kanye West

Never was much of a romantic
I could never take the intimacy
And I know I did damage
Cause the look in your eyes is killing me
I guess you’ve got another advantage
Cause you could blame me for everything
And I don’t know how I’ma manage
If one day you just up and leave

(via tepitome)



Free Man in Paris
Joni Mitchell
Court and Spark

memoriescantwait:

"Free Man in Paris" - Joni Mitchell

From Court and Spark (1974)


Happy birthday to little Rosie

Happy birthday to little Rosie




humansofnewyork:

These children are members of Iraq’s Yazidi minority, who are one of many minorities deemed expendable by ISIS militants. In the last few days, ISIS has moved into their villages and taken their homes. Tens of thousands of the villagers fled into a nearby range of mountains. Realizing this, ISIS circled the mountains with guns, blocked all the roads, and waited for them to die of thirst in the 120 degree heat. These children belonged to some of the families lucky enough to escape. While their parents were panicking about their relatives trapped in the mountains, these kids found a quiet place to play. I found them banging on some cans. I asked them what they were doing. “We’re building a car,” they said. "Isn’t that cute," I thought. "They’re imagining the cans are cars."When I came back 5 minutes later, they had punctured holes in all four cans. Using two metal wires as axles, they turned the cans into wheels, and attached them to the plastic crate lying nearby. They’d built a car. (Dohuk, Iraq)

humansofnewyork:

These children are members of Iraq’s Yazidi minority, who are one of many minorities deemed expendable by ISIS militants. In the last few days, ISIS has moved into their villages and taken their homes. Tens of thousands of the villagers fled into a nearby range of mountains. Realizing this, ISIS circled the mountains with guns, blocked all the roads, and waited for them to die of thirst in the 120 degree heat. These children belonged to some of the families lucky enough to escape. While their parents were panicking about their relatives trapped in the mountains, these kids found a quiet place to play. I found them banging on some cans. I asked them what they were doing. “We’re building a car,” they said. 
"Isn’t that cute," I thought. "They’re imagining the cans are cars."

When I came back 5 minutes later, they had punctured holes in all four cans. Using two metal wires as axles, they turned the cans into wheels, and attached them to the plastic crate lying nearby. They’d built a car. (Dohuk, Iraq)


pigballoon:

a marriage.

Is Jonze reworking his own personal history? In his ex-wife Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation (where Coppola’s alter-ego is played by Johansson—a bizarre coincidence?), the husband (a music video director) is oblivious to his wife’s alienation. Her is an admission of that obliviousness and a lament for it.”

(via daddyfuckedme)


adreianpayne:

yes hello we are open good morning

adreianpayne:

yes hello we are open good morning

(via commissarcorgi)


pitchfork:

Drake jumps on Atlanta newcomer iLoveMakonnen’s weeknight anthem “Club Going Up on a Tuesday” on our latest Best New Track.